“Ignorance is the enemy and it fills your head with lies.” ~ Rodney Crowell

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So, the Grand Poobah (my office buddy 😃) and I were yacking yesterday while he was working on an assignment that he didn’t know was appropriate or not. In the chapter he teaches on depression, he wanted to focus attention on suicide with the students reading various articles and watching a documentary about it before writing a paper. He wondered if this would be too triggering for some and we had a discussion about this.

Here’s the thing about triggers: we all have them. After my nephew died in the Navy, every time I heard anything about the military, my heart would pound and my stomach would get a hollow feeling. Before I was open about being bipolar, I’d get nervous talking about mental illness and the importance of awareness, yet I was living a lie which made me so anxious. After I engaged in self-harm, I would get horribly defensive if anyone mentioned cutting or accused me of doing it until I was able to share what I had done. And yes, after I attempted suicide myself, I was extremely sensitive to the topic.

But being a prof of Psychology and Sociology, I can’t back away from these issues because I talk about them in most of my classes. I’ll admit that the first time I taught about suicide after my attempt, I started crying…right in front of my class. I was so embarrassed because that has only happened a couple of times in my entire 3 decades of teaching, but the incident was still fresh in my mind. When I started crying, I quickly thought of lying to my students and telling them I wasn’t feeling well, etc. but then went back to how hypocritical I had been covering up being bipolar for most of my life. I lecture to my students how you have to live authentically and how there is no shame in having a mental illness or having attempted suicide. With that in mind and after a deep breath, I shared that I had attempted suicide myself and explained where I had been in my life at that time.

As I was talking, I couldn’t believe the reactions of the class…some shed tears and some nodded so genuinely that I knew they had had suicidal ideation themselves. After the lecture was over and resources perused, papers were turned in and this is some of what was written to me (with any identifying info taken out but all words of the students as they were written):

“I think the reason it was so hard for me to watch this film is because I have a history with depression. I will not lie and say I have never had a suicidal thought because I have. I used to be in a dark place with my mind and I am not ashamed of that because of how much I have grown. My chest started to get tight while watching the film because it took me back to that time in my life when I was really unhappy. I paused the film and took a break and it helped me. I thought this documentary was very sad and it shows a part of human life that is not shown that much. Suicide is not talked about as much as it should be. There should be more awareness and conversation.”

“This week was a very hard week for me when going over the material. I personally have battled with thoughts of suicide but never had the courage try anything. I grew up with a bipolar mother and struggled with my own anxiety and depression.”

“This topic is tough for me to discuss. I have lost multiple friends due to suicide. I was also almost a suicide victim myself. I struggled my entire life with depression and anxiety. To fully understand the impact of mental health and suicide, I will lay out my story. This is hard for me to do, but I feel it is essential to speak about it.”

“Lastly , I am a survivor of depression and attempting suicide as well. I chose article one because it really touches my life in the last year. My son was self harming by cutting himself on the legs and arms. The day I was told I stopped at nothing trying to find my son’s help. It went from that to last month I found out my son tried x-pills, 2 years of alcohol misuse, becoming withdrawn, rebellious, and just 2 months ago he attempted fighting my daughter and I , he would go from saying he wanted to kill himself, to nobody loving him, to breaking down crying. Glass shattered everywhere, holes in my wall that I’m still trying to get fixed, me trying to console him and my daughter, finally having to call for assistance and watching my son leave by the ambulance screaming he loves me.”

“I can relate to those who express suicidal thoughts, as its something I myself have struggled with. The best way to describe it, is a voice inside your head telling you that no one cares, and your life doesn’t really matter.”

The saddest thing about these comments is that I only picked out these 5 out of the 20 students I had; however, EVERY one of them wrote about their own personal struggles with suicide (the majority) or having a friend or sibling that has attempted or completed. That boggles my mind.

There is so much pain out there. So much loneliness. So much neediness in terms of connection. How horrible that for my students that this has already touched their lives. And from comments in other classes, I also know this class wasn’t an anomaly at all.

Now we talk about triggers which is something I hadn’t heard of or been cautioned about until a few years ago. Us professors are told to tell students when we’ll be studying a subject matter that could be triggering to them and to offer them alternatives. On the surface, this sounds like a good idea. However, the research begs to differ.

Take a look at findings published in Clinical Psychology Article:

“The consensus, based on 17 studies using a range of media, including literature passages, photographs, and film clips: Trigger warnings do not alleviate emotional distress. They do not significantly reduce negative affect or minimize intrusive thoughts, two hallmarks of PTSD. Notably, these findings hold for individuals with and without a history of trauma.”

Also, Forbes magazine reported this:

“Across all the variations in the studies, trigger warnings had trivial effects. In the words of Mevagh Sanson, senior author of the study, “The results suggest a trigger warning is neither meaningfully helpful nor harmful.” “The format of the presumably upsetting content, whether in text or on video, did not matter. Neither did a personal history of trauma; participants who reported they had experienced actual trauma in their lives responded to the distressing material similarly, regardless of whether it was preceded by a trigger warning or not.”

Finally, the Chronicle of Higher Education says this:

“We are not aware of a single experimental study that has found significant benefits of using trigger warnings. Looking specifically at trauma survivors, including those with a diagnosis of PTSD, the Jones et al. study found that trigger warnings “were not helpful even when they warned about content that closely matched survivors’ traumas.””

What do psychologists think? Let’s take a look-see at an article in Psychological Science:

“Specifically, we found that trigger warnings did not help trauma survivors brace themselves to face potentially upsetting content,” said Payton Jones, a researcher at Harvard University and lead author on the study. “In some cases, they made things worse.” Worryingly, the researchers discovered that trigger warnings seem to increase the extent to which people see trauma as central to their identity, which can worsen the impact of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in the long run.”

So, this sheds all new light in terms of triggers. Not only do they don’t seem to work, but they can also increase the distress of a student.

Now, what are usually seen as triggers? Suicide, eating disorders, sexual assault, domestic violence, mental illness, sex, murder, death and anything else the professor deems might be triggering to a student.

There’s absolutely no doubt these are very difficult subjects to learn about, but they are very important to understand. Every 11 seconds, another American takes their own life while there’s also 14 people being hurt by their intimate partner. One in 5 Americans live with a mental illness (51+ million people) and someone is raped every 68 seconds.

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Look, these are serious numbers and obviously going to touch all of our lives in one way or another. I once had someone tell me, after a difficult lecture, that ignorance is bliss. Heh? IGNORANCE is bliss? NOT understanding and being oblivious and uninformed is better? For who exactly? You? Us? Me?

If we don’t address these issues…talk about these issues…and learn all we can about them, how in the hell are we going to work at turning these numbers around?

You know, I was really distressed over the sexual abuse I experienced from my psychologist and I’ll be honest: anytime I heard about sexual abuse or rape, I would break out in a sweat and feel like my stomach dropped 10 floors down an elevator. Worse, I started working on a psychology degree and guess what I had to learn all about? I was really nervous when the topic was being presented but the way the professor taught it, I was able to look at it academically and there was truly a comfort in knowing I wasn’t alone. That what I was going through was normal. I learned about sexual abuse and realized that if I always turned my head away from it, I would never be able to use what I’d been through to help others. And that’s what I try to do now.

So here’s the answer to the Grand Poobah who is going to be reading this: keep your assignment on suicide. Students can take breaks when reading articles or watching videos but the information is vital. Suicide (as well as so many other topics I mentioned) is an epidemic and NOT talking about it and teaching about it only keeps it hidden away. I want my students to understand why people want to kill themselves…what signs they can look for…how to talk to someone who is suicidal. I want them to know what early signs of domestic violence are and to understand the pathology of mental illnesses. I want them to be educated in the issues that Americans face every day of their lives.

Unfortunately, I’ve had students come to me days after being raped and I would never ever expect them to complete a unit on sexual assault so soon after the traumatic experience…so there’s obvious exceptions to this. But, ignorance is not bliss and the info we teach isn’t always easy, but it is necessary. Until we face things and help students to understand that their own experiences can be talked about and explored and validated, we are doing them an injustice. We’re simply keeping everyone in the dark.

Kristi xoxo

Author: Kristi

Just a bipolar Professor working to end the stigma of mental illness.

9 thoughts on ““Ignorance is the enemy and it fills your head with lies.” ~ Rodney Crowell”

  1. you are such an amazing and wonderful person, your students are so lucky to have you! I teach accounting, so I don’t run into things that are triggering most days and I don’t really have any training in helping students who are dealing with trauma. I wish it was a part of our training, it would be far more valuable than some of the wasted hours in meetings.
    I was told once that I’m always optimistic – I replied that I had learned how to pull myself out of the well. I think we’ve all fallen into that well at times, some just can’t get out of it – and it breaks my heart that there’s so little help for them.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Oh Suzie…it should be part of training. In IL, we have a mandate that all colleges/universities offer their staff and students particular things, including repositories of information about mental health and illness, resources, how to help someone, etc. I spent ALL summer putting these together, by myself, for the college. And, they are really good. I cover all of the major disorders, show all local, county, state and national resources. Talk about suicide, rape, and domestic violence as well. Have downloadable pamphlets on every mental disorder/illness out there. Have the numbers of hotlines…and the list goes on. It truly was a labor of love simply because we’ve needed this for so long and our school has nothing to offer our students in a time when student depression and anxiety is at a high. Anyhoot, part of the mandate is to have training for the staff on how to use the resources responsibly and I had 4 different sessions to teach this: 2 were face to face and 2 were zoom. I had a TOTAL of 18 people attend over the 4 days when we have hundreds of employees. I don’t know why the deans/vp’s didn’t push this. It’s almost like mental health is the least of their worries in terms of students AND staff. I also asked to have a slot at a board of trustees meeting to present this info and just show what was provided. I was turned down. We give so much lip service to helping our students but so many colleges aren’t doing a fraction of what they should. So, some of us faculty try our best to remedy this. YOU are an amazing and wonderful person too…and I’m starting an entirely new fabric stash for our golden years. Now, are you Blanche, Dorothy, Rose, or Sophia??? You can choose first. ❤

      Liked by 1 person

      1. I’m totally Rose some days and Sophia on others. Have you ever seen Keeping Up Appearances? I’m the flightly younger sister on that, and totally Frankie on Grace and Frankie. Also, you are amazing for doing all that. I had a student come to me when we were still on campus and tell me she’d been raped the night before. I was calling everyone, the Dean, campus security, everyone I could think of. The rape wasn’t on campus, but they really stepped up and got her help. BUT I had no clue if I was doing the right things with her! My college preaches that we have to make sure the students succeed – well, hell, they can’t succeed if they can’t function!

        Liked by 1 person

      2. You are right but most faculty don’t realize that! Helping students succeed often starts by helping them deal with issues in which they have no other place to turn! I feel this is so important at the universities where the students are literally living on campus, but just as much so at community colleges! We are supposed to serve the community as a whole and be there for it. We also have so many students there for a reason, as opposed to a 4 year. Many are displaced or struggling with their GED or back in school after layoffs or closings or just too depressed or anxious to risk going away. They NEED us to be there which, as you say, helps with them overall!!! ❤️❤️❤️❤️❤️ And, I’ll watch keeping up appearances!

        Liked by 1 person

      3. I think part of the problem with my college anyway is that we accept anyone who’s breathing and then bend over backwards to try to make them succeed when some just really either aren’t ready, or shouldn’t be in college at all. There’s too much emphasis put on the “need” for a college education, and so we’re now looking at kids graduating with degrees that will never be useful and staggering debt. Meanwhile, some of us are struggling to teach basic math to people who are supposed to be ready to learn accounting!

        Liked by 1 person

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